One of the most successful strategies I've had in collecting 45s is to look for certain producers and arrangers whose work I'm familiar with. The list on this page is very short comparatively, and concentrates on producers from the 1960s-80s. These are individuals who had a large enough impact on the Rock 'n' Soul marketplace to influence trends and whose consistent work makes picking up unknown 45s with their names on them a good bet. If you like the work of one producer on this list, chances are you'll like other 45s they worked on as well. This is a companion list to other ones I'm preparing for collecting arrangers and songwriters; some producers listed here also appear on the songwriters page. Not included are producers whose work is not so distinctive that their presence on a 45 record's label may not be a good guide to whether you'll like other records they worked on (for example, Jerry Wexler and Tom Johnston).

Long-time 45 collectors understand that the universe of music released on 45 records is so vast it seems to just keep expanding as your collection grows. Counter-intuitive maybe, but true. In such a world, keying on who produced, arranged, or wrote a given song or artist you've never heard of before can lead to some excellent finds.

The list below is just a suggestion, and I plan to expand it as time permits. The artists are listed in alphabetical order. If you know of a producer who should be here and isn't, please send a note through the Classic 45s Comments form. Last Updated 08/05/16 with about 40 producers.


Steve Barri | Jeff Barry | Thom Bell | Bert Berns | Mike Chapman | Bob Crewe | Steve Cropper | Carl Davis | Don Davis | Dave Edmunds | Feldman-Goldstein-Gottehrer | Gamble-Huff | Henry Glover | Rick Hall | Holland-Dozier-Holland | Quincy Jones | Kasenetz-Katz | Lambert-Potter | Leiber-Stoller | Steve Lillywhite | Nick Lowe | Madara-White | George Martin | Curtis Mayfield | Van McCoy | Huey P. Meaux | Chips Moman | Mickie Most | Freddie Perren | Jerry Ragavoy | Eugene Record | Smokey Robinson | Rodgers-Edwards | Todd Rundgren | Brad Shapiro | Phil Spector | Bill Szymczyk | Tokens | Allen Toussaint | Teddy Vann | Norman Whitfield


_

Steve Barri
Steve Barri worked primarily as a producer, handling a vast array of artists in various genres, but mostly Power Pop, Bubblegum, and Northern Soul. Artist credits include Bobby Bland, Cashman & West, Bo Donaldson & Heywoods, Four Tops, Grass Roots, Hamilton, Joe Frank & Reynolds, Sam Harris, Barry McGuire, Rhythm Heritage, the Robbs, Tommy Roe, P.F. Sloan, Smith, and Dionne Warwick. His biggest and most notable hits as a producer, some co-produced with P.F. Sloan, include:
  • Billy, Don't Be A Hero (#1p, 1974) by Bo Donaldson & Heywoods
  • Ain't No Woman (Like The One I've Got) (#2r, #4p, 1973) by Four Tops
  • Let's Live For Today (#8p, 1967) by Grass Roots
  • Things I Should Have Said (#23p, 1967) by Grass Roots
  • Where Were You When I Needed You (#28p, 1967) by Grass Roots
  • Midnight Confessions (#5p, 1968) by Grass Roots
  • Temptation Eyes (#15p, 1970) by Grass Roots
  • Don't Pull Your Love (#4p, 1971) by Hamilton, Joe Frank And Reynolds
  • Eve of Destruction (#1p, 1965) by Barry McGuire
  • Theme From S.W.A.T. (#1p, #11r, 1975) by Rhythm Heritage
  • Movin' (#131p in 1969) by the Robbs
  • Dizzy (#1p, 1969) by Tommy Roe
  • Jam Up Jelly Tight (#8p, 1969) by Tommy Roe
  • Welcome Back (#1p, 1976) by John Sebastian
  • Do You Believe In Love At First Sight (Not charted, 1977) by Dionne Warwick
  • The Other Side Of Midnight (Not charted, 1977) by The Waters

_

Jeff Barry
Jeff Barry worked as a songwriter with Ellie Greenwich, but he was very active as a producer as well, both with Greenwich and other partners, including Andy Kim and Steve Venet. He worked with Soul artists, Girl Groups, and Bubblegum music primarily, with artists like The Ad Libs, The Archies, Bobby Bloom, Butterflys, Ron Dante, Neil Diamond, Sam Hawkins, Jelly Beans, Andy Kim, McCoys, Monkees, Raindrops, Shangri-Las, and Nino Tempo. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as a producer:
  • Sugar, Sugar (#1p, 1969) by The Archies
  • Jingle Jangle (#10p, 1969) by The Archies
  • Montego Bay (#8p, 1970) by Bobby Bloom
  • Cherry, Cherry (#6p, 1966) by Neil Diamond
  • Thank The Lord For The Night Time (#13p, 1967) by Neil Diamond
  • Rainy Day Bells (Not charted, 1970) by The Globetrotters
  • Hold On Baby (#10r, 1965) by Sam Hawkins
  • I Wanna Love Him So Bad (#9p, 1964) by Jelly Beans
  • Baby I Love You (#9p, 1969) by Andy Kim
  • I'm A Believer (#1p, 1966) by The Monkees
  • A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You (#2p, 1967) by The Monkees
  • The Kind Of Boy You Can't Forget (#27r, #17p, 1963) by the Raindrops
  • Leader of the Pack (#1p, 1964) by the Shangri-Las
  • Sister James (#53p, #78r, 1973) by Nino Tempo
  • The Palm Of Your Hand (Not charted, 1963) by Chuck Wright

_

Thom Bell
Bell worked primarily as a producer/arranger, though he also has some songwriting credits as well. He worked with some partners, too, including Linda Creed. Most of Bell's clients were Soul artists, and he came to be seen as one of the "founding fathers" of what came to be known as Philly-style Soul. Artists he worked with included The Delfonics, Archie Bell & Drells, Jerry Butler, Brenda & the Tabulations, Ronnie Dyson, O'Jays, Elton John, Melba Moore, New York City, Spinners, Peaches & Herb, Orlons, Stylistics, and Dionne Warwick. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as a producer or arranger:
  • La-La Means I Love You (#2r, #4p, 1968) by The Delfonics
  • Didn't I (Blow Your Mind This Time) (#3r, #10p, 1970) by The Delfonics
  • Only The Strong Survive (#1r, #4p, 1969) by Jerry Butler
  • One Man Band (Plays All Alone) (#15r, #28p, 1973) by Ronnie Dyson
  • Back Stabbers (#1r, #3p, 1972) by O'Jays
  • Love Train (#1r, #1p, 1973) by O'Jays
  • Mama Can't Buy You Love (#9p, #36r 1979) by Elton John
  • I'm Doin' Fine Now (#14r, #17p, 1973) by New York City
  • I'll Be Around (#1r, #3p, 1972) by The Spinners
  • Could It Be I'm Falling In Love (#1r, #4p, 1972) by The Spinners
  • Envy (In My Eyes) (Not charted, 1965) by The Orlons
  • Betcha By Golly Wow (#2r, #3p, 1972) by The Stylistics
  • You Make Me Feel Brand New (#5r, #2p, 1974) by The Stylistics
  • Once You Hit The Road (#5r, #79p, 1975) by Dionne Warwick
  • It's Gonna Take A Miracle (#1r, #10p, 1982) by Deniece Williams

_

Bert Berns
Also known as Bert Russell, Berns made major contributions to 1960s popular music, most often working with Soul artists. He has a few songwriting credits as well as production credits. Artists he worked with include The Drifters, Soloman Burke, Erma Franklin, Betty Harris, Isley Bros., Barbara Lewis, Van Morrison, Garnet Mimms, Wilson Pickett, Them, Freddie Scott, and Baby Washington. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as a producer:
  • Under the Boardwalk (#1r, #4p, 1964) by The Drifters
  • Saturday Night At The Movies (#18p, 1964) by The Drifters
  • Piece of My Heart (#10r, #62p, 1967) by Erma Franklin
  • Baby I'm Yours (#5r, #11p, 1965) by Barbara Lewis
  • Brown-Eyed Girl (#10p, 1967) by Van Morrison
  • Killer Joe (#16p, 1963) by Rocky Fellers
  • Gloria (#71p, 1965) by Them
  • Are You Lonely For Me (#1r, #39p, 1966) by Freddie Scott
  • My Girl Sloopy (#26p, 1964) by The Vibrations
  • More, More, More Love, Love, Love (Not charted, 1964) by Johnny Thunder
  • Twist And Shout (#2r, #17p, 1962) by Isley Brothers

_

Mike Chapman
Mike Chapman began producing rock acts in the 1970s and continued into the 1980s, and he also wrote hits with partner Nick Chinn. He produced hits by mainly Rock acts including Blondie, Pat Benatar, Exile, Nick Gilder, the Knack, Mud, Suzi Quatro, and Tina Turner. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as a producer:
  • Heart Of Glass (#1p, 1979) by Blondie
  • Invincible (#10p, 1985) by Pat Benatar
  • The Tide Is High (#1p, 1980) by Blondie
  • Kiss You All Over (#1p, 1978) by Exile
  • Hot Child In The City (#1p, 1978) by Nick Gilder
  • My Sharona (#1p, 1979) by The Knack
  • Tiger Feet (Not charted, 1974) by Mud
  • 48 Crash (Not charted, 1973) by Suzi Quatro
  • Living Next Door To Alice (#25p, 1976) by Smokie
  • One Of The Living (#41r, #15p, 1985) by Tina Turner

_

Bob Crewe
Bob Crewe has one of the longest careers as a producer, as well as writer with partner Frank Slay. Starting in the 1950s, Crewe worked with a great many artists over the years, including Freddy Cannon, Disco Tex, Four Seasons, Ellie Greenwich, Lesley Gore, Ben E. King, Mitch Ryder & Detroit Wheels, Oliver, Diane Renay, and Frankie Valli. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as a producer:
  • Night And Day (Not charted, 1962) by Johnny Cabott
  • Way Down Yonder in New Orleans (#14r, #3p, 1960) by Freddy Cannon
  • Music To Watch Girls By (#15p, 1966) by The Bob Crewe Generation
  • Get Dancin' (#32r, #10p, 1974) by Disco Tex and the Sex-O-Lettes
  • Stop Runnin' 'Round, Baby (Not charted, 1966) by Distant Cousins
  • Hollywood Hot (#45r, #55p, 1975) by Eleventh Hour
  • Dawn (Go Away) (#3p, 1964) by Four Seasons
  • Big Girls Don't Cry (#1r, #1p, 1962) by Four Seasons
  • Rag Doll/ Silence Is Golden (#1p, 1964) by Four Seasons
  • Let's Hang On! (#3p, 1965) by Four Seasons
  • Sherry (#1r, #1p, 1962) by Four Seasons
  • Working My Way Back To You (#9p, 1966) by Four Seasons
  • Goodnight, Goodnight (Not charted, 1967) by Ellie Greenwich
  • Bamboo Man (Not charted, 1964) by Jayson King
  • Devil With A Blue Dress On & Good Golly Miss Molly (#4p, 1966) by Mitch Ryder & Detroit Wheels
  • Break Out (#62p, 1966) by Mitch Ryder & Detroit Wheels
  • Good Morning Starshine (#3p, 1969) by Oliver
  • Dusty (#55p, 1965) by The Rag Dolls
  • Navy Blue (#6p, 1964) by Diane Renay
  • Jenny Take A Ride! (#10p, 1965) by Mitch Ryder & Detroit Wheels
  • My Eyes Adored You (#1p, 1974) by Frankie Valli
  • Don't Think Twice (#12p, 1965) by The Wonder Who

_

Steve Cropper
Steve Cropper was a session guitarist with Stax studios in Memphis, and he also played session guitar for other studios over the years. While at Stax and as a member of the "house band," Booker T & the MGs, he began working as a producer, and he also has some songwriting credits. He was also active in the 1970s and 1980s. During his time at Stax and since then, Cropper acted as producer for many Soul and Rock artists, including Eddie Floyd, Don Covay, Wilson Pickett, Otis Redding, John Cougar Mellencamp, and Rufus Thomas.
  • I've Got To Have Your Love (#50r, #102p, 1969) by Eddie Floyd
  • I've Never Found A Girl (To Love Me Like You Do) (#2r, #40p, 1968) by Eddie Floyd
  • Ninety-Nine and a Half (Won't Do) (#13r, #56p, 1966) by Wilson Pickett
  • (Sittin' On) The Dock of the Bay (#1r, #1p, 1968) by Otis Redding
  • Wait You Dog (Not charted, 1967) by Mable John
  • This Time (#27p, 1980) by John Cougar Mellencamp
  • 634-5789 (Soulsville, U.S.A.) (#1r, #13p, 1966) by Wilson Pickett
  • I've Been Loving You Too Long (To Stop Now) (#2r, #21p, 1965) by Otis Redding
  • The Memphis Train (Not charted, 1966) by Rufus Thomas

_

Carl Davis
Carl Davis was a prominent Chicago-based producer, primarily working with Soul acts. He also has some songwriting credits and shares some credits with fellow Chicago producers Eugene Record and Curtis Mayfield. Artists he worked with over the years (primarily in the 1960s and 1970s) include Barbara Acklin, Gene Chandler, the Artistics, Billy Butler, Major Lance, the Chi-Lites, Erma Franklin, Jackie Wilson, Mary Wells and Young-Holt Unlimited. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as a producer:
  • The Right Track (#24r, 1966) by Billy Butler
  • Love Makes A Woman (#3r, #15p, 1968) by Barbara Acklin
  • The Chase Is On (Not charted, 1967) by The Artistics
  • The Monkey Time (#4r, #8p, 1963) by Major Lance
  • Um, Um, Um, Um, Um, Um (#5p, 1964) by Major Lance
  • Baby Boy (#25r, 1969) by Fred Hughes
  • From The Teacher To The Preacher (#16r, #57p, 1968) by Gene Chandler & Barbara Acklin
  • 24 Hours Of Sadness (#30r, #119p, 1970) by The Chi-Lites
  • It's All Over (#10r, #67p, 1963) by Walter Jackson
  • Pretty Little Angel Eyes (Not charted, 1973) by The Lost Generation
  • (Your Love Keeps Lifting Me) Higher and Higher (#1r, #6p, 1967) by Jackie Wilson
  • Because Of You (#45r, 1973) by Jackie Wilson
  • Me And My Baby (Not charted, 1966) by Mary Wells
  • Soulful Strut (#3r, #3p, 1968) by Young-Holt Unlimited

_

Don Davis
Don Davis was an active producer during the 1960s and 1970s, working mainly with Soul artists. Artist credits include Darrell Banks, the Dells, the Holidays, Patti LaBelle, Emanuel Lasky, Johnnie Taylor, and the Dramatics. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as a producer:
  • Give Your Baby a Standing Ovation (#3r, #34p, 1973) by The Dells
  • No Greater Love (Not charted, 1966) by The Holidays
  • Lucky To Be Loved (By You) (Not charted, 1965) by Emanuel Lasky
  • Can't Shake It Loose (Not charted, 1966) by Pat Lewis
  • Who's Making Love (#1r, #5p, 1968) by Johnnie Taylor
  • I Believe In You (You Believe In Me) (#1r, #11p, 1973) by Johnnie Taylor
  • You Don't Have To Be A Star (To Be In My Show) (#1r, #1p, 1976) by Marilyn McCoo & Billy Davis Jr.

_

Dave Edmunds
Dave Edmunds is a guitarist extraordinaire who got his start in the U.K. group Love Sculpture and then pursued an on again-off again solo career with some successes such as his 1971 cover of "I Hear You Knocking." In the late 1970s, he began working as a producer along with fellow Brit and sometimes musical partner Nick Lowe (together, they formed the band Rockpile). Besides producing his own material, Edmunds also produced memorable music — much of it in a Rockabilly vein — for the Everly Brothers, Fabulous Thunderbirds, Flamin' Groovies, Foghat, Stray Cats, and George Thorogood. He also has some songwriting credits. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as a producer:
  • I Hear You Knocking (#4p, 1970) by Dave Edmunds
  • Crawling From The Wreckage/ Queen of Hearts (Not charted, 1979) by Dave Edmunds
  • Girls Talk (#65p, 1979) by Dave Edmunds
  • On The Wings Of A Nightingale (#50p, 1984) by Everly Brothers
  • Tuff Enuff (#10p, 1986) by Fabulous Thunderbirds
  • I Can't Hide (Not charted, 1976) by Flamin' Groovies
  • I Just Want To Make Love To You (#83p, 1972) by Shirley Ellis
  • Rock This Town (#9p, 1982) by Stray Cats
  • Stray Cat Strut (#3p, 1982) by Stray Cats

_

Feldman-Goldstein-Gottehrer
This trio — Bob Feldman, Jerry Goldstein and Richard Gottehrer — had their hands in countless hits from the 1960s, specializing in catchy Rock and Girl Group tunes, as well as some Northern Soul. They even formed a band, The Strangeloves, as an outlet for some of their work. They wrote as well as produced, though their reputation rests mainly on their production credits. Gottehrer continued producing into the 1980s, working with bands like The Go-Gos and Marshall Crenshaw. In the 1960s, acts they worked with included The Angels, Freddy Cannon, the McCoys, Strangeloves, Dean Parrish, and the Sheep. Here is a list of some of the trio's biggest and most notable hits as producers (including solo work by Richard Gottehrer):
  • My Boyfriend's Back (#2r, #1p, 1963) by The Angels
  • Wow Wow Wee (He's the Boy for Me) (#41p, 1964) by The Angels
  • Out In The Sun (Hey-O) (Not charted, 1965) by the Beach-Nuts
  • Wonderful Guy (Not charted, 1965) by Diane Christian
  • The Chicken Back (Not charted, 1963) by Bobby Comstock
  • Professional Lover (Not charted, 1964) by Lou Courtney
  • Hang On Sloopy (#1p, 1965) by The McCoys
  • Sorrow (Not charted, 1965) by The McCoys
  • Night Time (#30, 1966) by The Strangeloves
  • Turn On Your Lovelight/ Determination (Not charted, 1966) by Dean Parrish
  • We Got The Beat (#2p, 1982) by The Go-Go's
  • Someday, Someway (#36p, 1982) by Marshall Crenshaw
  • Hide & Seek (#58p, 1966) by Sheep
  • I Want Candy (#11p, 1965) by The Strangeloves

_

Gamble-Huff
Almost more than any other person or team, Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff developed the Soul style that came to be identified with Philadelphia, PA, in the 1970s: Philly Soul. Starting in the late 1960s and continuing into the early 1980s, they had a profound influence on the evolution of "Northern Soul", taking the basic Motown sound and adding keyboards, strings, and dramatic arrangements to move the bar toward what became known as "Disco" music in the mid-1970s. Besides producing, they also wrote many of their artists' hits, much as Holland-Dozier-Holland and Norman Whitfield did at Motown. Artists they worked with included Archie Bell & the Drells, Jerry Butler, the Intruders, the Futures, the Jacksons, Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes, the O'Jays, Billy Paul, Wilson Pickett, Lou Rawls, the Soul Survivors, Joe Simon, the Three Degrees, the Vibrations, and Dee Dee Warwick. Here is a list of some of this duo's biggest and most notable hits as producers and (in many cases) writers:
  • Here I Go Again (#112p, 1970) by Archie Bell & Drells
  • There's Gonna Be A Showdown (#6r, #21p, 1968) by Archie Bell & Drells
  • Hey Western Union Man (#1r, #16p, 1968) by Jerry Butler
  • Only The Strong Survive (#1r, #4p, 1969) by Jerry Butler
  • Take A Chance (Not charted, 1967) by The Cruisers
  • Cowboys To Girls (#1r, #6p, 1968) by The Intruders
  • Love Is Here (#47r, 1973) by The Futures
  • Enjoy Yourself (#2r, #6p, 1976) by The Jacksons
  • If You Don't Know Me By Now (#1r, #3p, 1972) by Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes
  • The Love I Lost (#1r, #7p, 1972) by Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes
  • TSOP (The Sound of Philadelphia) (#1r, #1p, 1974) by MFSB
  • Back Stabbers (#1r, #3p, 1972) by The O'Jays
  • Love Train (#1r, #1p, 1973) by The O'Jays
  • Envy (In My Eyes) (Not charted, 1965) by The Orlons
  • What Kind Of Lady (Not charted, 1967) by Dee Dee Sharp
  • Me And Mrs. Jones (#1r, #1p, 1972) by Billy Paul
  • Engine Number 9 (#3r, #14p, 1970) by Wilson Pickett
  • You'll Never Find Another Love Like Mine (#1r, #2p, 1976) by Lou Rawls
  • Expressway To Your Heart (#3r, #4p, 1967) by Soul Survivors
  • Drowning In The Sea Of Love (#3r, #11p, 1971) by Joe Simon
  • When Will I See You Again (#4r, #2p, 1974) by The Three Degrees
  • Love in Them There Hills (#38r, #93p, 1968) by The Vibrations
  • Slow Motion (#12r, #78p, 1972) by Johnny Williams

_

Henry Glover
Henry Glover was a producer/arranger active in the 1950s and 1960s, working mostly with Soul/RnB artists including the Cleftones, Joey Dee & Starliters, the Charms, Bill Doggett, Little Willie John, the Essex, Flamingos, Ronnie Hawkins, Louisiana Red, Sam & Dave, the Swallows, and Otis Williams. Here is a list of some of Glover's biggest and most notable hits as producer (some of these are arranging credits):
  • Heart and Soul (#10r, #18p, 1961) by The Cleftones
  • Peppermint Twist (#8r, #1p, 1961) by Joey Dee & Starliters
  • Hearts of Stone (#1r, #15p, 1954) by The Charms
  • Little Girl of Mine (#8r, #57p, 1956) by The Cleftones
  • Honky Tonk (#1r, #2p, 1956) by Bill Doggett
  • Fever (#1r, #24p, 1956) by Little Willie John
  • Let Them Talk (#11r, #100p, 1959) by Little Willie John
  • A Walkin' Miracle (#11r, #12p, 1963) by The Essex
  • Come On To My Party (Not charted, 1963) by The Flamingos
  • All She Wants To Do Is Rock (#1r, 1949) by Wynonie Harris
  • Who Do You Love (Not charted, 1963) by Ronnie Hawkins
  • Sleep (#10r, #13p, 1960) by Little Willie John
  • Drinkin' Wine, Spo-Dee-O-Dee (#2r, #26p, 1949) by Sticks McGhee & His Buddies
  • It Was So Nice While It Lasted (Not charted, 1963) by Sam & Dave
  • She's Alright (Not charted, 1963) by Sam & Dave
  • Love Me (Not charted, 1962) by The Suburbans
  • It Ain't The Meat (It's The Motion) (Not charted, 1951) by The Swallows
  • Ivory Tower (#5r, #11p, 1956) by Otis Williams & Charms

_

Rick Hall
Rick Hall was the founder of Fame Studios in Muscle Shoals, AL. As producer at Fame, he oversaw an incredible, multiracial house band (much like the one Stax had) who worked almost exclusively with Southern Soul artists. In the 1970s, he turned to producing Bubblegum Rock for the Osmonds and others. Artists he produced over the years include Clarence Carter, Paul Anka, Linda Carr, Aretha Franklin, Art Freeman, Arthur Conley, Bobbie Gentry, Willie Hightower, Etta James, Jimmy Hughes, Maurice & Mac, Bobby Moore, Laura Lee, the Osmonds, Wilson Pickett, Candi Staton, Bettye Swann and Spencer Wiggins. Here is a list of some of Hall's biggest and most notable hits as producer:
  • Patches (#2r, #4p, 1970) by Clarence Carter
  • (You're) Having My Baby (#1p, 1974) by Paul Anka
  • Slip Away (#2r, #6p, 1968) by Clarence Carter
  • I Never Loved a Man (The Way I Love You) (#1r, #9p, 1967) by Aretha Franklin
  • Slippin' Around With You (Not charted, 1966) by Art Freeman
  • Fancy (#31p, 1969) by Bobbie Gentry
  • Tell Mama/ I'd Rather Go Blind (#10r, #23p, 1967) by Etta James
  • Steal Away (#2r, #17p, 1964) by Jimmy Hughes
  • You Left The Water Running (Not charted, 1968) by Maurice & Mac
  • Searching For My Love (#7r, #27p, 1966) by Bobby Moore
  • Wanted: Lover, No Experience Necessary/ Up Tight, Good Man (#16r, #93p, 1967) by Laura Lee
  • One Bad Apple (#1p, #6r, 1971) by The Osmonds
  • Out Of My Mind (Not charted, 1975) by Rhodes, Chalmers & Rhodes
  • I'd Rather Be An Old Man's Sweetheart (Than A Young Man's Fool) (#9r, #46p, 1969) by Candi Staton
  • Double Lovin' (#44r, 1970) by Spencer Wiggins

_

Holland-Dozier-Holland
Like the legendary Philly Soul team of Gamble and Huff, Eddie and Brian Holland teamed with Lamont Dozier to make a huge impact on what became known as the "Motown Soul" sound. As both writers and producers (most often, only Brian Holland and Lamont Dozier are credited as producers, though all three are typically credited as writers), they began inauspiciously in 1962 with an unknown female trio called The Supremes, but finally in 1964 their combined talents clicked, and both The Supremes and The Four Tops, as well as other Motown acts like The Isley Bros, became the launching pads for a unique brand of dance music that's been much imitated both at the time and since. After breaking up with Motown in 1968, the team formed Invictus Records and due to contractural obligations began writing and producing under the names of Dunbar and Wayne. Through both Invictus and Hot Wax, the trio (or some combination thereof) kept their brand of Motown Soul alive into the mid-1970s. Here are a few of the biggest and most notable hits produced (and quite often also written) by Holland-Dozier-Holland:
  • Give Me Just A Little More Time (#8r, #3p, 1970) by Chairmen of the Board
  • Heaven Must Have Sent You (#9r, #50p, 1966) by The Elgins
  • She's Not Just Another Woman (#3r, #11p, 1971) by The 8th Day
  • Baby I Need Your Loving (#11p, 1964) by Four Tops
  • I Can't Help Myself (#1r, #1p, 1965) by Four Tops
  • Reach Out I'll Be There (#1r, #1p, 1966) by Four Tops
  • Standing in the Shadows of Love (#2r, 6p, 1966) by Four Tops
  • Can I Get A Witness (#3r, #22p, 1963) by Marvin Gaye
  • How Sweet It Is To Be Loved By You (#4r, #6p, 1964) by Marvin Gaye
  • This Old Heart of Mine (Is Weak For You) (#6r, 12p, 1966) by The Isley Bros.
  • Come and Get These Memories (#6r, #29p, 1963) by Martha & the Vandellas
  • Heat Wave (#1r, #4p, 1963) by Martha & the Vandellas
  • Nowhere To Run (#1r, #1p, 1964) by The Supremes
  • Band Of Gold (#20r, #3p, 1970) by Freda Payne
  • Love Is Like An Itching In My Heart/ He's All I Got (#7r, #9p, 1966) The Supremes
  • Where Did Our Love Go (#1r, #1p, 1964) The Supremes
  • You Can't Hurry Love (#1r, #1p, 1966) The Supremes
  • Take Me In Your Arms (Rock Me A Little While) (#4r, #50p, 1965) Kim Weston

_

Quincy Jones
Quincy Jones had a very long career as a producer who touched all kinds of music, beginning in the early 1960s with Girl Group legend Lesley Gore moving all the way to Funk sounds with the "King of Pop," Michael Jackson. Other artists he worked with over the years included Patti Austin, George Benson, Brothers Johnson, and Aretha Franklin. Here is a list of some of the Jones' biggest and most notable hits as a producer:
  • Baby Come to Me (#9r, #1p, 1982) by Patti Austin
  • Give Me The Night (#1r, #4p, 1980) by George Benson
  • I'll Be Good To You (#1r, #3p, 1976) by Brothers Johnson
  • Stomp! (#1r, #7p, 1980) by Brothers Johnson
  • It's My Party (#1r, #1p, 1963) by Lesley Gore
  • She's A Fool (#5p, #26r, 1963) by Lesley Gore
  • You Don't Own Me (#2p, 1963) by Lesley Gore
  • Billie Jean (#1r, #1p, 1983) by Michael Jackson
  • Beat It (#1r, #1p, 1983) by Michael Jackson
  • Don't Stop Til You Get Enough (#1r, #1p, 1979) by Michael Jackson
  • Man In The Mirror (#1r, #1p, 1988) by Michael Jackson
  • We Are The World (#1r, #1p, 1985) by USA for Africa
  • One More Break (Not charted, 1965) by Chuck Willis
  • Angel (#1r, #20p, 1973) by Aretha Franklin

_

Kasenetz-Katz
Jerry Kasenetz and Jeff Katz teamed up in the mid-1960s with apparently one goal in mind: Creating short, sweet, catchy, danceable Rock tunes that would appeal to teenagers — especially young teenagers. :-) Today, we call what they did Bubblegum Rock, and part of what makes Bubblegum is that the music is made wholly in the studio — a key strategy of this duo as they spread their special brand of loony fun to a variety of "groups," including Crazy Elephant, Flying Giraffe, K&K Super Circus, the Lemon Pipers, Magic Swirling Ship, Music Explosion, 1910 Fruitgum Co., and Ohio Express. Here is a list of some of the duo's biggest and most notable hits as producers:
  • Green Tambourine (#1p, 1967) by The Lemon Pipers
  • Love In Your Eyes (Not charted, 1968) by Magic Swirling Ship
  • Little Bit O'Soul (#2p, 1967) by Music Explosion
  • 1, 2, 3 Red Light (#5p, 1968) by 1910 Fruitgum Co.
  • Beg, Borrow and Steal (#29p, 1967) by Ohio Express
  • Yummy, Yummy, Yummy (#4p, 1968) by Ohio Express
  • Black Betty (#18p, 1977) by Ram Jam
  • Come And Take A Ride In My Boat (Not charted, 1966) by Rare Breed
  • Simon Says (#4p, 1968) by 1910 Fruitgum Co.
  • Quick Joey Small (Run Joey Run)/ (Poor Old) Mr. Jensen (Not charted, 1968) by Kasenetz-Katz Singing Orchestral Circus

_

Lambert-Potter
Dennis Lambert and Brian Potter teamed up in the late 1960s and had a string of hits with various groups in the 1970s, including the Four Tops, Glen Campbell, Grass Roots, Original Caste, Righteous Bros., and Tavares. The team also had some songwriting credits. Here is a list of some of the duo's biggest and most notable hits as producers:
  • Rhinestone Cowboy (#1p, #1c, 1975) by Glen Campbell
  • Ain't No Woman (Like The One I've Got) (#2r, #4p, 1973) by Four Tops
  • Mamacita (#71p, 1975) by Grass Roots
  • It's A Cryin' Shame (#44p, 1971) by Gayle McCormick
  • One Tin Soldier (#34p, 1969) by Original Caste
  • Baby Come Back (#10r, #1p, 1977) by Player
  • Rock and Roll Heaven (#3p, 1974) by Righteous Brothers
  • It Only Takes A Minute (#1r, #10p, 1975) by Tavares
  • Remember What I Told You To Forget (#4r, #25p, 1975) by Tavares
  • My Ship (Not charted, 1976) by Willie Harry Wilson

_

Leiber-Stoller
Mike Leiber and Jerry Stoller got the music bug in the early 1950s and had a huge impact on the development of Rock'n'Roll in the 1950s and early 1960s, in particular. Like other production teams, they wrote many of the hits they produced. Artists they worked with over the years include The Coasters, Ad Libs, Clovers, Dixie Cups, Drifters, Exciters, Jay & the Americans, Ben E. King, Stealers Wheel and Sammy Turner. Here is a list of some of the duo's biggest and most notable hits as producers (and frequently writers):
  • Along Came Jones/ That Is Rock & Roll (Not charted, 1959) by The Coasters
  • The Boy From New York City (#6r, #8p, 1965) by The Ad Libs
  • Love Potion No. 9 (#23r, #23p, 1959) by The Clovers
  • Searchin'/ Young Blood (#1r, #3p, 1957) by The Coasters
  • Yakety Yak (#1r, #1p, 1958) by The Coasters
  • Chapel Of Love (#1p, 1964) by Dixie Cups
  • Fools Fall In Love (#10r, #69p, 1957) by The Drifters
  • On Broadway (#7r, #9p, 1963) by The Drifters
  • Save the Last Dance for Me (#1r, #1p, 1960) by The Drifters
  • There Goes My Baby (#1r, 2p, 1959) by The Drifters
  • Up On The Roof (#4r, #5p, 1962) by The Drifters
  • Tell Him (#5r, #4p, 1963) by The Exciters
  • She Cried (#5p, 1962) by Jay & The Americans
  • Spanish Harlem (#15r, #10p, 1961) by Ben E. King
  • Stand By Me (#1r, #4p, 1961) by Ben E. King
  • Smokey Joe's Cafe (#10r, #79p, 1955) by The Robins
  • Stuck In The Middle With You (#6p, 1973) by Stealers Wheel
  • Always (#2r, #19p, 1959) by Sammy Turner

_

Steve Lillywhite
U.K.'s Steve Lillywhite began producing rock acts in the late 1970s and through the 1980s, working with a dizzying variety of some of the best rock bands of the era, including U2, Big Country, the Brains, Rolling Stones, Talking Heads, and XTC. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as a producer:
  • New Year's Day (#53p, 1983) by U2
  • In A Big Country (#17p, 1983) by Big Country
  • Money Changes Everything (Not charted, 1980) by The Brains
  • Harlem Shuffle (#5p, 1986) by The Rolling Stones
  • (Nothing But) Flowers (Not charted, 1988) by Talking Heads
  • Two Hearts Beat As One (#101p, 1983) by U2
  • Vertigo (#31p, 2004) by U2
  • Generals and Majors (#104p, 1981) by XTC
  • Making Plans for Nigel (Not charted, 1979) by XTC

_

Nick Lowe
Nick Lowe is a singer/guitarist/songwriter who was a big influence on the late 1970s/early 1980s "New Wave" of U.K. artists. Besides his own recorded output, Lowe also worked as a producer with a distinctive touch in the 1980s, producing artists such as Elvis Costello, Paul Carrack, The Pretenders, and Rockpile. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as a producer:
  • Alison/ Watching The Detectives (Not charted, 1978) by Elvis Costello
  • (What's So Funny 'Bout) Peace, Love and Understanding (Not charted, 1978) by Elvis Costello
  • Less Than Zero (Not charted, 1977) by Elvis Costello
  • I Need You (#37p, 1982) by Paul Carrack
  • Radio Radio (Not charted, 1978) by Elvis Costello
  • Accidents Will Happen (#101p, 1979) by Elvis Costello
  • (I Love the Sound of) Breaking Glass (Not charted, 1978) by Nick Lowe
  • Cruel To Be Kind (#12p, 1979) by Nick Lowe
  • Stop Your Sobbing (#65p, 1980) by The Pretenders
  • Teacher Teacher (#51p, 1980) by Rockpile

_

Madara-White
John Madara and David White teamed up beginning in the late 1950s and had a big influence on the sound of Rock'n'Roll in the early 1960s. Artists they produced included Len Barry, Billy & the Essentials, the Pixies Three, the Secrets, Bunny Sigler, and the Sherrys. They also have songwriting credits, including "At The Hop" by Danny & the Juniors and "You Don't Own Me" by Lesley Gore. Here is a list of some of the duo's biggest and most notable hits as producers (some are songwriting credits as well):
  • 1-2-3 (#11r, #2p, 1965) by Len Barry
  • The Dance Is Over/ Steady Girl (Not charted, 1962) by Billy & the Essentials
  • It Ain't What You Got (Not charted, 1964) by The Panics
  • 442 Glenwood Avenue/ Cold Cold Winter (#56p, 1964) by Pixies Three
  • The Boy Next Door (#18p, 1963) by The Secrets
  • Follow Your Heart (Not charted, 1967) by Bunny Sigler
  • Let The Good Times Roll & Feel So Good (#20r, #22p, 1967) by Bunny Sigler
  • Pop Pop Pop-Pie (#25r, #35p, 1962) by The Sherrys
  • Like A Baby/ Happiness (#27p, 1966) by Len Barry
  • Birthday Party (#40p, 1963) by Pixies Three

_

George Martin
George Martin's fame rests primarily on his work as producer for the most successful Rock band of all — The Beatles. But the U.K. producer handled other acts over the years as well, including America, Jeff Beck, David & Jonathan, Cheap Trick, Elton John, Billy J. Kramer & Dakotas, Paul McCartney, and Ultravox. Here is a list of some of Martin's biggest and most notable hits as a producer:
  • A Hard Day's Night (#1p, 1964) by The Beatles
  • Sister Golden Hair (#1p, 1975) by America
  • Can't Buy Me Love (#1p, 1964) by The Beatles
  • Come Together/Something (#1p, 1969) by The Beatles
  • Help!/ I'm Down (#1p, 1965) by The Beatles
  • Hey Jude/ Revolution (#1p, 1968) by The Beatles
  • I Feel Fine/ She's A Woman (#1p, 1964) by The Beatles
  • I Want To Hold Your Hand/ I Saw Her Standing There (#1p, 1964) by The Beatles
  • Let It Be (#1p, 1970) by The Beatles
  • Paperback Writer/ Rain (#1p, 1966) by The Beatles
  • Penny Lane/ Strawberry Fields Forever (#1p, 1966) by The Beatles
  • She Loves You (#1p, 1964) by The Beatles
  • Ticket To Ride (#1p, 1965) by The Beatles
  • We Can Work It Out/ Day Tripper (#1p, 1965) by The Beatles
  • Yesterday (#1p, 1965) by The Beatles
  • Step Inside Love (Not charted, 1968) by Cilla Black
  • The Magic Book (Not charted, 1966) by David & Jonathan
  • Candle in the Wind 1997 (#1p, 1997) by Elton John
  • Bad To Me/ Little Children (#9p, 1964) by Billy J. Kramer with the Dakotas
  • The Night Owls (#6p, 1981) by Little River Band
  • Live And Let Die (#2p, 1973) by Paul McCartney
  • Reap The Wild Wind (#71p, 1983) by Ultravox

_

Curtis Mayfield
Besides his work with The Impressions, for whom he wrote most of their hits, Curtis Mayfield produced many other, mostly Chicago-based Soul acts over the years, including The Fascinations, Five Stairsteps, Walter Jackson, Gladys Knight & Pips, Major Lance, Barbara Mason and the Staple Singers. Here is a list of some of Martin's biggest and most notable hits as a producer (including some with writing credits as well):
  • This Is My Country (#8r, #25p, 1968) by The Impressions
  • Girls Are Out To Get You (Not charted, 1967) by The Fascinations
  • You've Been Cheatin' (#12r, #33p, 1965) by The Impressions
  • All I Need (Not charted, 1967) by June Conquest
  • Ooh, Baby Baby/ The Girl I Love (#34r, #63p, 1967) by The Five Stairsteps
  • It's All Over (#10r, #67p, 1964) by Walter Jackson
  • On And On (#2r, #5p, 1974) by Gladys Knight & Pips
  • Freddie's Dead (#2r, #4p, 1972) by Curtis Mayfield
  • Don't Start None (Not charted, 1965) by The Mayfield Singers
  • Stay Away From Me (I Love You Too Much) (#13r, #67p, 1970) by Major Lance
  • Give Me Your Love (#9r, #31p, 1972) by Barbara Mason
  • Superfly (#5r, #6p, 1972) by Curtis Mayfield
  • Let's Do It Again (#1r, #1p, 1975) by The Staple Singers

_

Van McCoy
Casual music fans likely associate Van McCoy with his big Disco hit, "The Hustle," but McCoy was a lot more important to Soul music history than that! In fact, he didn't even produce "The Hustle!" Starting in the early 1960s, McCoy wrote, arranged and produced in a distinctive style for a dizzying number of artists, mostly in Soul genres, including the Ad Libs, Chris Bartley, Brenda & Tabulations, D.C. Playboys, Faith, Hope & Charity, Darren Green, Intrigues, Gladys Knight & Pips, Melba Moore, New Censation, Peaches & Herb, Presidents, David Ruffin, the Stylistics, and Oscar Weathers. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as a producer (including some with writing and arranging credits as well):
  • On And Off (#41r, #90p, 1972) by Anacostia
  • The Sweetest Thing This Side of Heaven (#32r, 1967) by Chris Bartley
  • One Girl Too Late (#48r, 1973) by Brenda & Tabulations
  • Why Didn't I Think of That (#34r, #107p, 1971) by Brenda & Tabulations
  • You Were All I Needed (Not charted, 1964) by D.C. Playboys
  • So Much Love (#14r, #51p, 1971) by Faith Hope & Charity
  • Am I Cold, Am I Hot (Not charted, 1975) by Bill Harris
  • To Each His Own (#1r, #50p, 1975) by Faith Hope & Charity
  • You're Messin' Up My Mind (Not charted, 1966) by Herb Fame
  • The Language of Love (#21r, #100p, 1971) by The Intrigues
  • Baby Don't Change Your Mind (#10r, #52p, 1977) by Gladys Knight & Pips
  • Sweet and Easy (Not charted, 1969) by Van McCoy
  • This Is It (#18r, #91p, 1976) by Melba Moore
  • I've Got Nothin' But Time (#79r, 1974) by The New Censation
  • 5-10-15-20 (25-30 Years Of Love)/ I'm Still Dancing (#5r, #11p, 1970) by The Presidents
  • Heavy Love (#8r, #47p, 1976) by David Ruffin
  • Let Me Make You Happy (Not charted, 1971) by Billy Woods
  • Just Let Me Hold You For A Night/ Rode By The Place (Where We Used To Stay) (#18r, #108p, 1977) by David Ruffin
  • Pledging My Love/ I'm Your Good Thing (#31r, 1972) by Oscar Weathers

_

Huey P. Meaux
Texan Huey P. Meaux produced a large number of Rock and Soul acts during the 1960s and 1970s, imparting a distinctive sound to the work of artists like Dale & Grace, Freddy Fender, the Hombres, Jivin' Gene, Barbara Lynn, Jackie Paine, Sir Douglas Quintet, Rockin' Sidney, and B.J. Thomas. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as a producer:
  • Cry Your Eyes Out (Not charted, 1967) by Dottie Cambridge
  • Do 'Em All/ This Is Blue Eyed Soul (Not charted, 1966) by Boogie Kings
  • The Loneliest Night/ I'm Not Free (#65p, 1964) by Dale & Grace
  • Before The Next Teardrop Falls (#1c, #1p, 1975) by Lou Christie
  • Let It Out (Let It All Hang Out) (#12p, 1967) by The Hombres
  • Breaking Up Is Hard To Do (#69p, 1959) by Jivin' Gene
  • You'll Lose a Good Thing (#1r, #8p, 1962) by Barbara Lynn
  • Movin' On A Groove (Not charted, 1967) by Barbara Lynn
  • Anyone Can Love Him (Not charted, 1972) by Jean Knight
  • This Is The Thanks I Get (#39r, #65p, 1968) by Barbara Lynn
  • You're Losing Me (Not charted, 1968) by Barbara Lynn
  • Go Go Train (Not charted, 1966) by Jackie Paine
  • She's About A Mover (#13p, 1965) by Sir Douglas Quintet
  • My Toot Toot (Not charted, 1985) by Rockin' Sidney
  • Lover's Holiday (#8r, #31p, 1969) by Peggy Scott & Jo Jo Benson
  • The Rains Came (#31p, 1966) by Sir Douglas Quintet
  • Bring Back The Time (#75p, 1966) by B.J. Thomas

_

Chips Moman
Chips Moman was a Memphis boy who made a name for himself in the 1960s and 1970s primarily as a producer of Soul, Country and Rock artists who passed through the various Memphis studios, especially Stax and American. Moman also wrote some important songs and has some arranging credits as well. Artists he produced over the years include William Bell, the Box Tops, Wayne Carson, Cymarron, Neil Diamond, the Gentrys, Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, James & Bobby Purify, Sandy Posey, Merrilee Rush, Joe Simon, B.J. Thomas, and Bobby Womack. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as a producer:
  • You Don't Miss Your Water (#95p, 1962) by William Bell
  • I Shall Be Released (#67p, 1969) by The Box Tops
  • She's Got Everything I Need (Not charted, 1968) by Wayne Carson
  • Rings (#17p, 1971) by Cymarron
  • Brother Love's Traveling Salvation Show (#22p, 1969) by Neil Diamond
  • Keep On Dancing (#4p, 1965) by The Gentrys
  • Luckenbach, Texas (#1c, #25p, 1977) by Waylon Jennings
  • Always On My Mind (#1c, #5p, 1982) by Willie Nelson
  • Born A Woman (#12p, 1966) by Sandy Posey
  • What A Woman In Love Won't Do (#31p, 1966) by Sandy Posey
  • Angel of the Morning (#7p, 1968) by Merrilee Rush
  • Hooked On A Feeling (#5p, 1968) by B.J. Thomas
  • I Just Can't Help Believing (#9p, 1970) by B.J. Thomas
  • The Eyes Of A New York Woman (#28p, 1968) by B.J. Thomas
  • Bahama Mama (Not charted, 1967) by Jamo Thomas
  • More Than I Can Stand (#23r, #90p, 1970) by Bobby Womack
  • What Is This (#33r, 1968) by Bobby Womack

_

Mickie Most
Mickie Most produced a wide array of mostly U.K. artists during the 1960s, imparting a distinctive, minimalist vibe to his work that's similar to the approach Chips Moman took with his artists. Rock acts Most produced included the Animals, Donovan, Herman's Hermits, Hot Chocolate, Lulu, and Terry Reid. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as a producer:
  • Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood (#15p, 1965) by The Animals
  • It's My Life (#23p, 1965) by The Animals
  • The House of the Rising Sun (#1p, 1964) by The Animals
  • We Gotta Get Out Of This Place (#13p, 1965) by The Animals
  • Whole Lotta Love (#58p, 1971) by C.C.S.
  • Atlantis/ To Susan on the West Coast Waiting (#7p, 1969) by Donovan
  • Hurdy Gurdy Man (#5p, 1968) by Donovan
  • Sunshine Superman (#1p, 1966) by Donovan
  • Can't You Hear My Heartbeat (#2p, 1965) by Herman's Hermits
  • I'm Into Something Good (#13p, 1964) by Herman's Hermits
  • Mrs. Brown You've Got A Lovely Daughter (#1p, 1965) by Herman's Hermits
  • Every 1's A Winner (#7r, #6p, 1978) by Hot Chocolate
  • Brother Louie (Not charted, 1973) by Hot Chocolate
  • You Sexy Thing (#6r, #3p, 1975) by Hot Chocolate
  • To Sir With Love (#1p, #9r, 1967) by Lulu
  • Dance With The Devil/ And Then There Was Skin (#49p, 1974) by Cozy Powell
  • Super Lungs (Not charted, 1969) by Terry Reid
  • One Fine Girl (Not charted, 1965) by The Symbols

_

Freddie Perren
Freddie Perren produced many mostly Soul artists in the 1970s/80s with Philly Soul and Disco styles. Artists he worked with include Gloria Gaynor, Michael Jackson, Jackson 5, Miracles, Peaches & Herb, Sylvers and Tavares. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as a producer (some of these are also arranging and/or composing credits):
  • I Will Survive (#4r, #1p, 1978) by Gloria Gaynor
  • If I Can't Have You (#1p, #60r, 1978) by Yvonne Elliman
  • Do It Baby (#4r, #13p, 1974) by The Miracles
  • Love Machine (#1p, #5r, 1975) by The Miracles
  • Makin' It (#5p, 1979) by David Naughton
  • Reunited (#1r, #1p, 1979) by Peaches & Herb
  • Shake Your Groove Thing (#4r, #5p, 1978) by Peaches & Herb
  • Boogie Fever (#1r, #1p, 1975) by The Sylvers
  • Hot Line (#3r, #5p, 1976) by The Sylvers
  • Heaven Must Be Missing An Angel (#3r, #15p, 1976) by Tavares
  • More Than A Woman (#36r, #32p, 1977) by Tavares

_

Jerry Ragavoy
Jerry Ragavoy (also, Ragovoy) was a 1960s producer with a distinctive style, working mainly with Soul artists. He also has some arranging and writing credits to his name. Artists he worked with included Lorraine Ellison, Lou Courtney, Claudine Clark, the Majors, Garnet Mimms, Howard Tate, Gene Pitney, and Roy Redmond. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as a producer:
  • Stay With Me (#11r, #64p, 1966) by Lorraine Ellison
  • I Can't Escape From You (Not charted, 1965) by Ritchie Adams
  • What Do You Want Me To Do (#48r, 1973) by Lou Courtney
  • A Little Bit Now (A Little Bit Later) (#63p, 1962) by The Majors
  • Looking For You (Not charted, 1965) by Garnet Mimms
  • A Wonderful Dream (#23r, #22p, 1962) by The Majors
  • That Goes To Show You (#115p, 1965) by Garnet Mimms
  • Cry Baby (#1r, #4p, 1963) by Garnet Mimms & The Enchanters
  • Good Lovin' (#81p, 1965) by The Olympics
  • If You See My Baby (Not charted, 1964) by The Pirouettes
  • Mecca (#12p, 1963) by Gene Pitney
  • Ain't Nobody Home (#12r, #63p, 1966) by Howard Tate
  • Ain't That Terrible (Not charted, 1967) by Roy Redmond
  • Let's Get Together (Not charted, 1968) by The Staple Singers
  • Get It While You Can (#134p, 1967) by Howard Tate
  • You Don't Miss a Good Thing (Until It's Gone) (#109p, 1965) by Irma Thomas
  • Take It From Me (#30p, 1975) by Dionne Warwick

_

Eugene Record
Eugene Record was a Chicago-based songwriter/producer who worked in the 1960s and 1970s mainly with Chicago Soul artists, including The Chi-Lites, Barbara Acklin, the Artistics, Fred Hughes, Erma Franklin, the Visitors, Jackie Wilson, and Young-Holt Unlimited. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as a producer:
  • Have You Seen Her (#1r, #3p, 1971) by The Chi-Lites
  • After You (#30r, 1969) by Barbara Acklin
  • Love Makes A Woman (#3r, #15p, 1968) by Barbara Acklin
  • Oh Girl (#1r, #1p, 1972) by The Chi-Lites
  • Baby Boy (#25r, 1969) by Fred Hughes
  • Gotta Find Me A Lover (24 Hours A Day) (#40r, 1969) by Erma Franklin
  • I'm In Danger (Not charted, 1968) by The Visitors
  • I Still Love You (#39r, #105p, 1969) by Jackie Wilson
  • Soulful Strut (#3r, #3p, 1968) by Young-Holt Unlimited

_

Smokey Robinson
William "Smokey" Robinson was one of the first members of the Motown team, joining Barry Gordy, Jr., in the late 1950s and forming his group, The Miracles. Thought of primarily as a songwriter, Smokey Robinson was also one of the most successful producers at Motown, one third of the "major Motown producers" triad that includes Holland-Dozier-Holland and Norman Whitfield. Over the span of time (Robinson never left the Motown fold as so many other artists did eventually), Smokey produced most Motown acts, including himself and The Miracles as well as Marvin Gaye, Brenda Holloway, The Contours, the Marvelettes, The Temptations, and Mary Wells. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as a producer (see the writers page for writing credits):
  • Ain't That Peculiar (#1r, #8p, 1965) by Marvin Gaye
  • I'll Be Doggone (#1r, #8p, 1965) by Marvin Gaye
  • One More Heartache (#4r, #29p, 1966) by Marvin Gaye
  • When I'm Gone (#12r, #25p, 1965) by Brenda Holloway
  • First I Look At The Purse (#12r, #57p, 1965) by The Contours
  • Don't Mess With Bill (#3r, #7p, 1966) by The Marvelettes
  • Cruisin' (#4r, #4p, 1979) by Smokey Robinson
  • The Hunter Gets Captured By The Game (#2r, #13p, 1967) by The Marvelettes
  • Baby Come Close (#7r, #27p, 1973) by Smokey Robinson
  • I Second That Emotion (#1r, #4p, 1967) by The Miracles
  • Let Me Be The Clock (#4r, #31p, 1980) by Smokey Robinson
  • Going To A Go-Go/ Choosey Beggar (#2r, #11p, 1965) by The Miracles
  • Ooo Baby Baby (#4r, #16p, 1965) by The Miracles
  • My Girl Has Gone (#3r, #14p, 1965) by The Miracles
  • The Tears Of A Clown (#1r, #1p, 1970) by The Miracles
  • The Tracks of My Tears (#2r, #16p, 1965) by The Miracles
  • You've Really Got A Hold on Me (#1r, #8p, 1962) by The Miracles
  • My Girl (#1r, #1p, 1965) by The Temptations
  • Since I Lost My Baby (#4r, #17p, 1965) by The Temptations
  • Get Ready (#1r, #29p, 1966) by The Temptations
  • The Way You Do The Things You Do (#1r, #11p, 1964) by The Temptations
  • You Lost The Sweetest Boy/ What's Easy For Two Is So Hard For One (#8r, #22p, 1963) by Mary Wells
  • My Guy (#1r, #1p, 1964) by Mary Wells
  • You Beat Me To The Punch (#1r, #9p, 1962) by Mary Wells

_

Nile Rodgers-Bernard Edwards
Nile Rodgers and Bernard Edwards teamed up as songwriters/producers in the late 1970s and stamped their own unique brand onto "Disco" through working with artists like Chic, Diana Ross, and Sister Sledge. Here is a list of some of their biggest and most notable hits as producers (many are writing credits as well):
  • Dance, Dance, Dance (Yowsah, Yowsah, Yowsah) (#6r, #6p, 1977) by Chic
  • Good Times (#1r, #1p, 1979) by Chic
  • Le Freak (#1r, #1p, 1978) by Chic
  • Backfired (#43p, #71r, 1981) by Debbie Harry
  • I'm Coming Out (#6r, #5p, 1980) by Diana Ross
  • Upside Down (#1r, #1p, 1980) by Diana Ross
  • He's The Greatest Dancer (#1r, #9p, 1979) by Sister Sledge
  • We Are Family (#1r, #2p, 1979) by Sister Sledge

_

Todd Rundgren
Todd Rundgren is a singer/songwriter, early a member of Nazz, who had a reasonably successful solo career. However, perhaps his biggest impact on Rock music in the 1970s and 1980s has been as producer of acts like Grand Funk Railroad, Badfinger, Meat Loaf, Psychedelic Furs, Patti Smith, and XTC. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as producers (some are writing credits as well):
  • We're An American Band (#1, 1973) by Grand Funk Railroad
  • Baby Blue (#14p, 1972) by Badfinger
  • Walk Like A Man (#19p, 1973) by Grand Funk Railroad
  • Paradise By The Dashboard Light (#39p, 1978) by Meat Loaf
  • Two Out Of Three Ain't Bad (#11p, 1978) by Meat Loaf
  • Love My Way (#44p, 1982) by Psychedelic Furs
  • Bang The Drum All Day (#63p, 1983) by Todd Rundgren
  • I'm An Adult Now (#6m, 1988) by Pursuit of Happiness
  • I Saw The Light (#16p, 1972) by Todd Rundgren
  • We Gotta Get You A Woman (#20p, 1970) by Runt
  • Frederick (#90p, 1979) by Patti Smith Group
  • Set Me Free (#27p, 1980) by Utopia

_

Brad Shapiro
Brad Shapiro was active in the late 1960s and 1970s, working mainly as a producer (sometimes with partner Steve Alaimo or Dave Crawford) of Soul artists such as Jimmy "Bo" Horne, Millie Jackson, Betty Lavette, Jackie Moore, Wilson Pickett, Clarence Reid, Joe Simon, Dee Dee Warwick, and Betty Wright. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as a producer:
  • I Can't Speak (Not charted, 1968) by Jimmy Bo Horne
  • Hurts So Good (#3r, #24p, 1973) by Millie Jackson
  • If You're Not Back in Love By Monday (#5r, #43p, 1977) by Millie Jackson
  • Take Your Love (And Shove It) (#116p, 1969) by Kane's Cousins
  • Salty Tears (Not charted, 1976) by Thelma Jones
  • Girl I Got News For You (Not charted, 1967) by Benny Latimore
  • Mojo Hannah (Not charted, 1971) by Tammi Lynn
  • Darling Baby (#22r, #106p, 1972) by Jackie Moore
  • Make Me Feel Like A Woman (#6r, 1975) by Jackie Moore
  • Take A Closer Look At The Woman You're With (#17r, #90p, 1973) by Wilson Pickett
  • Fire And Water (#2r, #24p, 1971) by Wilson Pickett
  • Nobody But You Babe (#7r, #40p, 1969) by Clarence Reid
  • Cold Night In Georgia (#44r, 1971) by Dee Dee Warwick
  • Girls Can't Do What The Guys Do (#15r, #33p, 1968) by Betty Wright

_

Phil Spector
Phil Spector practically wrote the book on the early 1960s Girl Group sound, and he's justifiably famous for his "Wall of Sound" production approach, which has been much imitated over the course of Rock history. Spector started in the late 1950s and was active through the 1980s, working with a diverse array of artists like Bobb B. Soxx & the Blue Jeans, Sonny Charles & Checkmates, the Beatles, the Crystals, Cher, Dion, George Harrison, Curtis Lee, John Lennon, Darlene Love, Gene Pitney, the Ramones, Righteous Bros., Ronettes, John Prine, and Ike & Tina Turner. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as a producer:
  • Why Do Lovers Break Each Other's Heart? (#38p, 1963) by Bobb B. Soxx & the Blue Jeans
  • Black Pearl (#8r, #13p, 1969) by Sonny Charles & Checkmates
  • Puddin N' Tain (#43p, 1963) by Alley Cats
  • The Long And Winding Road (#1p, 1970) by The Beatles
  • Da Doo Ron Ron (#5r, #3p, 1963) by The Crystals
  • The Bells (Not charted, 1961) by The Creations
  • He's A Rebel (#2r, #1p, 1962) by The Crystals
  • Then He Kissed Me (#8r, #6p, 1963) by The Crystals
  • Make The Woman Love Me (Not charted, 1974) by Dion
  • My Sweet Lord (#1p, 1970) by George Harrison
  • What Is Life (#10p, 1971) by George Harrison
  • Pretty Little Angel Eyes (#7p, 1961) by Curtis Lee
  • Under The Moon of Love (#46p, 1962) by Curtis Lee
  • Instant Karma (We All Shine On) (#3p, 1970) by John Lennon
  • (Today I Met) The Boy I'm Gonna Marry (#39p, 1963) by Darlene Love
  • Imagine (#3p, 1971) by John Lennon
  • A Fine Fine Boy (#53p, 1963) by Darlene Love
  • Christmas (Baby Please Come Home) (Not charted, 1963) by Darlene Love
  • Every Breath I Take (#42p, 1961) by Gene Pitney
  • I Love How You Love Me (#5p, 1961) by Paris Sisters
  • Do You Remember Rock N' Roll Radio? (Not charted, 1980) by The Ramones
  • You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin' (#1p, #3r, 1964) by The Righteous Bros.
  • Unchained Melody (#6r, #4p, 1965) by The Righteous Bros.
  • Baby, I Love You (#24p, 1963) by The Ronettes
  • Be My Baby (#4r, #2p, 1963) by The Ronettes
  • Do I Love You? (#34p, 1964) by The Ronettes
  • River Deep-Mountain High (#88p, 1966) by Ike & Tina Turner
  • A Love Like Yours (Don't Come Knocking Every Day) (Not charted, 1967) by Ike & Tina Turner
  • So Young (Not charted, 1964) by Veronica

_

Bill Szymczyk
This producer with the consonant-heavy last name was very active in the 1970s and 1980s, working with bands like The Eagles, Elvin Bishop, Rick Derringer, Jay Ferguson, J. Geils Band, B.B. King, the James Gang, Joe Walsh, Bob Seger, and The Who. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as a producer:
  • Hotel California (#1p, 1977) by The Eagles
  • Fooled Around And Fell In Love (#3p, #82r, 1976) by Elvin Bishop
  • Take It To The Limit (#4p, 1975) by The Eagles
  • One Of These Nights (#1p, 1975) by The Eagles
  • Thunder Island (#9p, 1977) by Jay Ferguson
  • The Thrill Is Gone (#3r, #15p, 1969) by B.B. King
  • Give It To Me (#30p, 1973) by J. Geils Band
  • Funk #49 (#59p, 1970) by The James Gang
  • Life's Been Good (#12p, 1978) by Joe Walsh
  • Against The Wind (#5p, 1980) by Bob Seger
  • Rocky Mountain Way (#23p, 1970) by Joe Walsh
  • You Better You Bet (#18p, 1981) by The Who

_

Tokens
Besides putting out their own excellent Doo Wop and Sunshine Pop singles on RCA, B.T. Puppy, and other labels in the 1960s, The Tokens (Hank Medress, Phil Margo, Mitch Margo, and Jay Siegel) produced prolifically during the 1960s and 1970s, and they have a lot of songwriting crecdits as well. As producers, they often went under the name "Bright Tunes," working with artists as diverse as The Chiffons, the Buddies, Dusk, Four Pennies, Lou Gossett, The Happenings, Robert John, Tony Orlando & Dawn, Randy & the Rainbows, the Summits, Johnny Thunder, and Frankie Valli. Here is a list of some of the team's biggest and most notable hits as producers (including some with writing and arranging credits as well):
  • A Love So Fine (#40p, 1963) by The Chiffons
  • He's So Fine (#1r, #1p, 1963) by The Chiffons
  • On The Go (Not charted, 1964) by The Buddies
  • One Fine Day (#6r, #5p, 1963) by The Chiffons
  • Sweet Talkin' Guy (#10p, 1966) by The Chiffons
  • I Hear Those Church Bells Ringing (#53p, 1971) by Dusk
  • My Block (#67p, 1963) by Four Pennies
  • See You In September (#3p, 1966) by The Happenings
  • The Lion Sleeps Tonight (#3p, 1972) by Robert John
  • Candida (#3p, 1970) by Dawn
  • Knock Three Times (#1p, 1970) by Dawn
  • Denise (#18r, #10p, 1963) by Randy & The Rainbows
  • Till The Water Stops Runnin' (Not charted, 1973) by Johnny Thunder
  • I Hear Trumpets Blow (#30p, 1966) by The Tokens
  • She Lets Her Hair Down (Early In The Morning) (#61p, 1969) by The Tokens

_

Allen Toussaint
Allen Toussaint infused nearly everything he did (including a large body of songs) with the sound of his native New Orleans. His distinctive production work, often with partner Marshall Sehorn, carved out a unique genre of Funky Soul in the 1960s and 1970s. Artists he produced over the years included Lee Dorsey, Lee Calvin, Joe Cocker, Ernie K-Doe, Chris Kenner, Dr. John, Betty Harris, LaBelle, the Meters, the Showmen, and Maurice Williams. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as a producer (including some with writing and arranging credits as well):
  • Ride Your Pony (#7r, #28p, 1965) by Lee Dorsey
  • Hurry Back To Me (Not charted, 1967) by Diamond Joe
  • Fun Time (#43p, 1978) by Joe Cocker
  • Holy Cow (#10r, #23p, 1966) by Lee Dorsey
  • Working In The Coal Mine (#5r, #8p, 1966) by Lee Dorsey
  • Mother-in-Law (#1r, #1p, 1961) by Ernie K-Doe
  • Land of 1,000 Dances (#77p, 1963) by Chris Kenner
  • Right Place Wrong Time (#19r, #9p, 1973) by Dr. John
  • (Everybody Wanna Get Rich) Rite Away (#42r, #76p, 1973) by Dr. John
  • I'm Evil Tonight (Not charted, 1966) by Betty Harris
  • Ain't No Backing Up Now (Not charted, 1975) by Isis
  • Lady Marmalade (#1r, #1p, 1974) by LaBelle
  • Cissy Strut (#4r, #23p, 1969) by The Meters
  • Hey Pocky A-Way (#31r, 1974) by The Meters
  • It Will Stand (#80p, 1964) by The Showmen
  • Being Without You (Not charted, 1966) by Maurice Williams
  • Brother John (Not charted, 1976) by The Wild Tchoupitoulas

_

Teddy Vann
Teddy Vann was a 1960s producer of mainly Soul music, working with artists like the Bobbettes, Tony Fox, Larry Hale, Sandpebbles, Johnny Thunder, and Tender Slim. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as a producer (including some with writing credits as well):
  • In Paradise (Not charted, 1964) by The Bobbettes
  • Soul Train (Not charted, 1965) by Dixie Drifter
  • (I've Got To) Do It To It (Not charted, 1967) by Tony Fox
  • Shout And Do The Duck (Not charted, 1966) by Larry Hale
  • Love Power (#14r, #22p, 1967) by The Sandpebbles
  • If You Didn't Hear Me The First Time (I'll Say It Again) (#42r, #122p, 1968) by The Sandpebbles
  • Forget It/ Psychedelic Technicolor Dream (#10r, #81p, 1967) by The Sandpebbles
  • Loop De Loop (#6r, #4p, 1962) by Johnny Thunder
  • The Rosy Dance (#122p, 1963) by Johnny Thunder
  • Teenage Hayride (#93p, 1960) by Tender Slim

_

Norman Whitfield
Together with Barrett Strong, Norman Whitfield wrote many of the most loved Motown hits, perhaps second only to Holland-Dozier-Holland as Motown's premier hit-maker. (Smokey Robinson is definitely in the mix, too!) Besides, writing, Whitfield produced most Motown acts and was active in the post-Motown 1970s as well, including Marvin Gaye, the Isley Bros., Gladys Knight & the Pips, the Marvelettes, Rare Earth, Rose Royce, Edwin Starr, Jimmy Ruffin, the Temptations, and Undisputed Truth. Here is a list of some of his biggest and most notable hits as a producer (see the writers page for writing credits):
  • I Heard It Through The Grapevine (#1r, #1p, 1968) by Marvin Gaye
  • Too Busy Thinking About My Baby (#1r, #4p, 1969) by Marvin Gaye
  • I Heard It Through The Grapevine (#1r, #2p, 1967) by Gladys Knight & the Pips
  • The End Of Our Road (#5r, #15p, 1968) by Gladys Knight & the Pips
  • Too Many Fish In The Sea (#15r, #25p, 1965) by The Marvelettes
  • (I Know) I'm Losing You (#7p, 1970) by Rare Earth
  • Car Wash (#1r, #1p, 1976) by Rose Royce
  • War (#3r, #1p, 1970) by Edwin Starr
  • Gonna Give Her All The Love I've Got (#14r, #29p, 1967) by Jimmy Ruffin
  • (I Know) I'm Losing You (#1r, #8p, 1966) by The Temptations
  • Ain't Too Proud To Beg (#1r, #13p, 1966) by The Temptations
  • Beauty Is Only Skin Deep (#1r, #3p, 1966) by The Temptations
  • Ball of Confusion (#2r, #3p, 1970) by The Temptations
  • I Wish It Would Rain (#1r, #4p, 1968) by The Temptations
  • Just My Imagination (#1r, #1p, 1971) by The Temptations
  • I Can't Get Next To You (#1r, #1p, 1969) by The Temptations
  • Papa Was A Rollin' Stone (#5r, #1p, 1972) by The Temptations
  • Smiling Faces Sometimes/ You Got The Love I Need (#2r, #3p, 1971) by Undisputed Truth
  • Needle In A Haystack (#31r, #45p, 1964) by The Velvelettes
  • You're My Everything (#3r, #5p, 1967) by The Temptations