Throughout the history of Rock'n'Soul, producers and artists have tinkered with the mix of songs pressed to 45 rpm records, and in some cases decided to go back in the studio to completely re-record a song. In other cases, the 45 was recorded and released first, and then the artist or producer/arranger did some tinkering or re-recording after the fact for the LP version. These unique mixes and takes most often never again saw the light of day, as compilation albums done later opted for the LP version rather than seeking out the original single mix/take. Only by collecting the original 45s can you be sure you've got the version of a song that was played on the radio at the time — in other words, the version that became a hit (or not as the case may be). (Most of the 45s shown here were hits in their day.)

Note: This is a partial list that is still being fleshed out; still working on descriptions, some of which come courtesy of the Steve Hoffman Music Forums. If you know of a record that should be here, send me a note through the Classic 45s Contacts page. The records are presented in rough chronological order. Last Updated 03/07/16, this page shows about 180 45s.

1956
Harry Belafonte
RCA 6663
The 45 version is completely different from the subsequently released album cut.
1956
Sonny James
Capitol 3602
This original pressing has a different version from the one you hear on reissues.
1960
Smokey Robinson and The Miracles
Tamla 54034
When "Shop Around" was first released on Tamla 54034 in 1960, it had a different take of the song, which Motown quickly pulled from the market. Though this take has pretty much the same arrangement, it has a totally different Smokey Robinson vocal and totally different production approach. Unlike the hit version, this one is not awash in echo and the dynamics are richer. In addition, the electric guitar part shines through clearly at various places, especially the end of the second chorus.
1961
The Marathons
Arvee 5027
This is the original—and, many think, superior—version of the song, which was later re-recorded for Chess and released on Argo 5027.
1963
Rolf Harris
Epic 9596
Reportedly, the original 45 contains relatively primitive recordings done at an Australian radio station, whereas the album has a re-recording done with George Martin.
1964
Jan & Dean
Liberty 55672
Reportedly different from the album cut; details unknown.
1964
The Beatles
Tollie 9008
The single version has Ringo on drums, whereas for the LP they substituted another drummer (Pete Best, I believe).
1964
The Beatles
Capitol 5327
These tracks were not released on any U.K. album, but were included on the U.S.-only album Beatles '65. Apparently, the tracks were substantially remixed by Capitol from those they received from EMI (the U.K. company that owned the Beatles recordings).
1964
The Drifters
Atlantic 2237
The original 45 has a different version of the song than the one that appears on reissues and compilation albums. Unlike those, the original has a distinct variation in the vocal on the lines "Under the boardwalk/Down by the sea/On a blanket with my baby's where I'll be." The difference is apparent in the last two verses.
1964
The Rolling Stones
London 9708
When first released on 45 in the U.S., the song began with just an organ intro (no guitar). A later release added the iconic guitar part most are used to hearing.
1965
Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass
A&M 787
Reportedly, the 45 version has more "taxi horn" sounds than the LP cut.
1965
Lee Dorsey
Amy 927
The 45's mix is slightly different from the version I was used to, from a Lee Dorsey compilation LP.
1965
Simon & Garfunkel
Columbia 43396
The classic A side was a track from the duo's first LP, "Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M." For this single, producer Tom Wilson overdubbed an electric guitar courtesy of Al Gorgoni, plus an electric bass and drums. (The single was also briefly available with the pure-folk version of the song.) A subsequent LP contains the electrified version.
1965
The Animals
MGM 13382
This is an interesting case. The U.S. single version is the same as the original U.S. LP version, but it was a different take from that released in the U.K. Reportedly, MGM received an alternate take. The problem is that it's the U.K. version — not the U.S. hit version — that appears on subsequent reissues of the album and compilations. The U.S. single version wasn't available anywhere until until a CD compilation revived it some years back. (The U.S. 45 version is now the clear favorite in iTunes.)
1965
The Beach Boys
Capitol 5395
The hit 45 version is a completely different recording from the one that appears on compilation albums, such as the supposedly definitive 1974 2-album set "Endless Summer." That LP's version is longer, has different instrumentation and concludes with a "louder/softer", repeated-chorus thing. The original "Beach Boys Today!" album also contains the re-recorded version.
1965
The Beatles
Capitol 5476
Reportedly, the Mono 45 has a totally different vocal (sounding "more desperate and sincere") than on the LP.
1965
The Byrds
Columbia 43332
Reportedly different from the album cut; details unknown.
1966
Donovan
Epic 10045
If all you've ever heard is the 4:30 version found on the Donovan's greatest hits collection, you're missing out. The original 3:05 edit on 45 rpm is not only tighter but has a much better mix, with more punch to the guitars. I'm not sure if it's a different take rather than a remix/edit, but I do know that it's the version you want in your collection.
1966
Herman's Hermits
MGM 13500
This original single version is a different take from that which appears on most Herman's Hermits compilations and reissues.
1966
Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels
New Voice 817
Reportedly, on the single, after the guitar part near the end, the song goes back to "Fe Fe Fi Fi Fo Fo Fum," whereas on the LP it goes to "Wearing her pearls and her diamond rings". Not sure if this an edit as opposed to a "remix."
1966
The Mamas & The Papas
Dunhill 4031
Reportedly different from the album cut; details unknown.
1966
The Monkees
Colgems 1002
Reportedly, "Steppin' Stone" on the 45 is missing the chorus on the second stanza, and on "I'm A Believer" the clapping in the Background has some echo/reverb added on the 45 Mono mix.
1966
The Supremes
Motown 1097
Clearly, this is a different version from that you hear on reissues. It's not just that it's a Mono instead of Stereo mix... there are clear instrument mixing differences as well. For example, the first guitar chord rings quite differently on the original 45 than on reissues, and Diana's voice isn't drenched in echo.
1966
The Who
Decca 32058
Reportedly, the 45 version is a different take than what appears on the Who's greatest hits package "Meaty Beaty Big and Bouncy."
1967
Jefferson Airplane
RCA 9297
Reportedly, the 45 has a radically different, much punchier mix than the LP version. The "airplane" sounds at the beginning and end are also quite different on the 45.
1967
Laura Lee
Chess 2013
This is the version produced by Rick Hall... very different from—and superior to—another version released on the same label number by a different producer.
1967
The Association
WB 7074
Reportedly different from the album cut; details unknown.
1967
The Buffalo Springfield
Atco 6499
The 45 version reportedly has an added guitar overdub and a different "feel" than the LP cut.
1967
The Cryan' Shames
Columbia 44037
Reportedly a different take than the album cut; details unknown.
1967
The Lemon Pipers
Buddah 239
Reportedly, the original Mono mix on 45 rpm "blows away" the weaker LP (Stereo) version.
1967
The Mamas & The Papas
Dunhill 4083
Reportedly a different mix than the album cut; details unknown.
1967
The Monkees
Colgems 1007
Reportedly a notably different mix than the album cut, which has no Davy Jones vocals in the bridge, for example.
1967
The Who
Decca 32206
Reportedly, the 45 release contains a bass overdub missing on the LP version.
1968
Love Sculpture
Parrot 335
Reportedly, the 45 version has a different recording than the one done for an album 2 years later.
1968
People
Capitol 2078
In this case, it's the promo version that has a unique mix. Reportedly, the promo 45 is edited and mixed differently...most notably, the final note of the song is barely heard on the album/commercial 45, but much louder on the promo 45.
1968
Steppenwolf
Dunhill/ABC 4138
Reportedly, some edits were made to the vocals so that the 45 version has the phrase "Goes Far/Flies Near," whereas the LP has "Flies Far/Goes Near."
1968
Steppenwolf
Dunhill/ABC 4161
Reportedly, the first part of the 45 was re-recorded, and the rest was sped up, remixed and edited.
1968
The Bee Gees
Atco 6603
Reportedly, the single is faster, mixed differently, and is more dramatic, especially at the end.
1968
The Cryan' Shames
Columbia 44638
Reportedly a more powerful mix than the LP cut.
1969
1910 Fruitgum Co.
Buddah 114
This is a different recording—slightly slower beat and different vocals—from the one that appears on some later compilations, such as Rhino's "The Best of the 1910 Fruitgum Co. and Other Bubblegum Smashes" LP.
1969
Blood, Sweat & Tears
Columbia 44871
Reportedly, the 45 is an edit of a different mix. "It doesn't merely use the swelling horn intro; the horn intro begins with a piano chord. The album's extended horn solo is replaced with a much shorter, searing guitar (that's actually tracked over what on the LP are a series of 'empty' measures prior to where the LP horn solo begins). The album version, which ends with the band alternating with singsong recorders until the entire take devolves into chaos and a laughed off observation "that wasn't too good", is truncated and edited" for the 45.
1969
The Guess Who
RCA 0300
This version, which appeared on the album "American Woman," is a different take than the one that appeared earlier on the "Canned Wheat" LP.
1969
The Youngbloods
RCA 9752
Reportedly a different take than the album cut; details unknown.
1969
Thunderclap Newman
Track 2656
Reportedly, the album version is remixed and has a saxophone overdub during the piano solo.
1970
Bread
Elektra 45701
Reportedly, the 45 contains either a major remix of the LP cut or perhaps even a different recording.
1970
Christie
Epic 10626
Reportedly, the original 2:40 45 pressing has a different mix than the LP cut.
1970
Jethro Tull
Reprise 0899
Verify that this is the same version that appeared (or not?) on the U.S. LP.
1970
Joe Cocker
A&M 1174
Reportedly, the 45 version has a horn overdub at the end and is missing the applause that appears on the LP.
1970
Neil Young
Reprise 0911
Reportedly, for the 45 Neil and Danny Whitten switched their vocal parts. The 45 also has higher-mixed hand clapping.
1970
R. Dean Taylor
Rare Earth 5013
Reportedly, the original single mix of this 45 has a Gunfight erupting at the end, and the siren at the beginning isn't as noticeable. This mix was later replaced on 45 to one that probably mirrors the LP version.
1970
Simon & Garfunkel
Columbia 45133
By the way, it's not your imagination — the 45 rpm version of "Cecilia" is speeded up from the LP version, which probably explains why the track is only 2:40 on the 45 but 2:55 when I recorded it from the LP.
1970
Smokey Robinson and The Miracles
Tamla 54199
Reportedly, the single version was remixed and had a different bass line overdubbed on it. The mono LP version has a "totally weird" vocal track.
1970
The Beatles
Apple 2764
In this case, the 45 came first, and the subsequent LP version has different guitar solos and is slightly remixed and longer.
1970
The Guess Who
RCA 0325
The single is a unique mix that was edited out of album track "New Mother Nature."
1970
The Jaggerz
Kama Sutra 502
Early copies of this single have a rare variant that was pulled by the record company fairly early in the song's chart cycle. Why? Well, presumably somebody didn't like the psychedelic-style vocal feedback layered onto the final verse. I'm not sure whether the LP version has that overdub or not.
1970
Wadsworth Mansion
Sussex 209
Reportedly, the 45 "bubblegum" version was re-recorded for the LP into a more Country-style tune.
1971
James Taylor
WB 7460
This is a totally different — and actually much better — version than the one that appears on the album "Sweet Baby James." Clearly, Taylor and the band went back in to the studio to lay down a tighter, more hit-worthy recording, and the effort paid off!
1971
Marvin Gaye
Tamla 54201
This 45 rpm release is a different mix than the LP cut... and different from what you find on today's stereo reissues. The drums and percussion are mixed much more prominently, while the strings are toned down. The single edits out the jive talk at the beginning of the LP cut, but adds an odd fadeout-surprise fadein right at the ending. There are other differences as well — for example, the LP cut adds finger-popping that's absent from the 45 version. Listening to this version is like hearing this one for the first time!
1971
Ralph McTell
Paramount 0096
This 1971 release is a completely different, and, to my ear, more heartfelt, recording than the 1974 version, which became a huge hit in the U.K. that year.
1971
Three Dog Night
Dunhill/ABC 4272
Reportedly, the 45 features a prominent guitar solo dubbed over the album's electric piano solo. The 45 also sounds like a different mix vocally.
1972
Badfinger
Apple 1844
Reportedly, the 45 has reverb added to the snare drum.
1972
Jackson Browne
Asylum 11006
This is a completely different recording from the LP version... Much catchier and even a little more uptempo.
1972
Looking Glass
Epic 10874
Reportedly a different mix than the album cut; details unknown.
1972
Steely Dan
ABC 11338
Besides being much shorter, the 45 version reportedly edits the keyboard solo out of the middle.
1972
The Edgar Winter Group
Epic 11024
Reportedly, on the 45 the tambourine in the beginning is "hotter", the guitar solo is different than the LP version. Also, on the ending when they sing "Come on and take a free ride, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah", the vocal is sung higher than on the LP.
1972
The Moody Blues
Deram 85023
This 45 from the "Days of Future Passed" LP lacks many features of the album version/mix. On the single version, there's no orchestral introduction, no orchestral outro... in fact, there's no orchestra whatsoever — the single features just the core band, with Mike Pinder adding flourishes on his Mellotron. It also lacks the LP's spoken word poem (a bookend to the poem at the album's opening), and instead ends with a dramatic floor tom fill (that, on the LP, is buried under the first of a series of orchestral crescendos).
1973
Barbra Streisand
Columbia 45944
Reportedly, the 45 version has a completely different vocal than the LP counterpart.
1973
Bette Midler
Atlantic 2964
Reportedly, the 45 version is a different performance produced by Barry Manilow, whereas the "Divine Miss M" LP version was produced by Joel Dorn.
1973
Focus
Sire 704
Besides being dramatically edited from the LP version, the single reportedly transposes some of the components.
1973
Ohio Players
Westbound 214
Reportedly, the 45 version has an entirely different drum intro. "This alone has made this version more desirable among soul, funk, and hip-hop collectors. While the "worm" sound has been sampled a lot of times, the open break in the intro without extra sounds is more desirable for looping and chopping."
1973
Stealers Wheel
A&M 1450
Reportedly, the single version, released first, is an entirely different performance and arrangement from the later LP version.
1973
The Allman Brothers Band
Capricorn 0027
Reportedly, the 45 version is somewhat slowed down from the LP version.
1973
The Carpenters
A&M 1468
Reportedly, the 45 version is a remix with new vocals.
1974
Anne Murray
Capitol 3867
Reportedly, compared with the LP cut, the 45 has a different mix with more instrumentation.
1974
Carol Douglas
Midland I. 10372
This special promo has two remixed versions of the song, quite different from the retail version.
1974
David Bowie
RCA 0287
The 45 has a different mix than the LP version.
1974
Rufus Featuring Chaka Khan
ABC 11427
Reportedly, the 45 has a different mix; details unknown.
1974
Three Dog Night
Dunhill/ABC 4294
Reportedly, on the 45 everything after the "listening to a song" temporary stop is different — a different lead vocal, a different backing vocal, and a little breakdown (the "Wa-ah" vocal part) before the song resumes.
1975
Fleetwood Mac
Reprise 1339
The single has a slightly different—and shorter—mix than the LP cut.
1975
Kraftwerk
Vertigo 203
Aside from being much shorter than the album cut, the 45 version reportedly has mixing differences and some overdubs.
1975
Nazareth
A&M 1671
Reportedly, the single version removes the slide guitar solo present in the LP cut.
1975
Polly Brown
GTO 1002
Reportedly, this 45 adds synthesizers, giving the song a stronger "feel."
1976
Fleetwood Mac
Reprise 1345
Reportedly, the single has a hotter mix; also, Lindsey's guitar is edited out at the end and the line "Dreams unwind, love's a state of mind" is repeated 4 times as it fades, more often than on the LP.
1976
Fleetwood Mac
Reprise 1356
The single version is not only edited down but remixed from the LP cut.
1977
Foreigner
Atlantic 3410
Reportedly, a string section appears at the end of the 45 version that is lacking on the LP version.
1978
Boney M
Sire 1027
The 45 is a remixed version of the LP cut.
1978
Eddie Money
Columbia 10663
Reportedly, the 45 has a different mix; details unknown.
1978
Eddie Money
Columbia 10765
Reportedly, on the 45 Eddie's vocals are more urgent, the lyrics are slightly different, there is an additional chorus and extra guitar fills, and there is a faded ending on the 45 version. Overall, the 45 mix is "hotter" than the album version.
1978
Elvis Costello and the Attractions
Columbia 10705
Reportedly, the 45 version adds synthesized strings not found on the LP cut.
1978
Genesis
Atlantic 3474
According to Goldmine, this is a "radically different mix" than the LP version.
1978
Magazine
Virgin 200
Reportedly, this U.K. single and the corresponding album version are completely different takes.
1978
Talking Heads
Sire 1032
The B side of "Take Me To The River" is a different version from the one on the band's debut album, "More Songs About Building And Food."
1979
Dire Straits
WB 8736
This special promo release is actually a different recording from the one on the album. The vocal and guitar phrasing are quite distinct compared with the stock copy.
1979
Nick Lowe
Columbia 11018
Reportedly, the 45 has a different mix; details unknown.
1979
The Brains
Gray Matter 1
This first release on Gray Matter is a different recording than the one the group re-recorded for Mercury.
1979
The Records
Virgin 67000
Reportedly, the 45 has a different mix; details unknown.
1979
Bonnie Pointer
Motown 1459
The A side of this single — the hit version — is a special mix not available on the album; the B side is the quite different LP version.
1980
Joy Division
Factory 23
Reportedly, the 45 has a different take; details unknown.
1980
Michael Jackson
Epic 50838
Reportedly, the single version has a lot of reverb on the vocals and has additional guitars.
1980
Pat Benatar
Chrysalis 2419
Reportedly, on the 45 the guitar is much more prominent in the mix — one can hear little "bursts" of guitar in spots where they are not on the LP version.
1981
Patti Austin
Qwest 49854
This is a completely different — and superior — mix to the one released later on Qwest 29727.
1981
The Rolling Stones
Rolling Stones 21004
This promo's label indicates that this version is a "Remix by Bob Clearmountain," different from the album cut.
1982
Go-Go's
I.R.S. 9903
Reportedly, the 45 was remixed and re-edited (removes a bit to get to the second verse more quickly) from the album cut.
1982
Modern Romance
Atlantic 89911
This is a different, superior mix than that on Atlantic 89835, released a year later.
1982
The Pointer Sisters
Planet 13327
This is the first release of "I'm So Excited," which oddly flopped on both Pop and Black/RnB radio. The tune was remixed and re-released in 1984, and climbed as high as #9 on the U.S. Pop chart.
1983
Modern English
Sire 29775
Reportedly a different mix than the LP cut. The single version has added guitar overdubs and backing vocals, and for some reason, mixed completely in mono.
1983
R.E.M.
Hib-Tone 0001
The original Hib-Tone 45 has a completely different version of "Radio Free Europe" than the one released later on I.R.S.
1983
The Fixx
MCA 52264
The 45 has a "Remixed Edited Version" of the album cut.
1983
Jim Capaldi
Atlantic 89849
This 3:36 track is labeled a Remix of the album cut.
1983
Duran Duran
Capitol 5215
These tunes were first released on Harvest 5175 in late 1982, and then re-released in 1983 on Capitol, when "Rio" hit #14p in April. What's particularly interesting is that the two singles had two different mixes/edits of each song! The Harvest single had "Hold Back The Rain" on the A side in a shorter edit than the one here (and on the album), and the case for "Rio" was the reverse, with the single an edited version of the 5:33 album track.
1984
Elton John
Geffen 29292
This promo has an edited version (4:05) of the LP cut that's labeled the "Special Radio Mix."
1984
Frankie Goes To Hollywood
Island 99805
This is the original 1984 release, which has a different mix from the version that hit #10 in January 1985. This special promo also has a much shorter (3:02) edited version of the song.
1984
Murray Head
RCA 13988
This special promo has the "U.S. Radio Edit" (4:05) on one side and the "Original European Hit" (3:54) version on the other.
1984
Phil Collins
Atlantic 89700
Reportedly, the 45 has a different mix; details unknown.
1984
Teena Marie
Epic 04619
This special promo has a "Remixed Version" of the album cut (same as on retail 45 release).
1984
The Style Council
Geffen 29359
Reportedly, the single version, which preceded their debut album, "Cafe Bleu," was a breezy piece of horn-laden summer pop; the version of the song on the album is a mournful piano ballad.
1984
U2
Island 45816
This promo has two versions that differ from the LP cut, including a "Special Remix For Radio" version.
1984
ZZ Top
WB 29272
The label indicates that this 3:33 recording is a "Remix & Edit" of the album cut. Reportedly, one version has a pure synth opening, while the other is more guitar-based.
1984
Daryl Hall & John Oates
RCA 13970
The promo release has a longer "Remixed Edited Version" on one side.
1984
Elton John
Geffen 29292
This promo has a "Special Radio Mix" version of the song that's slightly shorter than the retail edit.
1984
Autograph
RCA 13953
This single was the L.A. group's only National hit, and it got pretty high for a tune that rocks so hard. It has a "special extended mix", which is actually longer than the 3:58 album cut.
1984
Art Of Noise
Island PR 595
This promo copy features a completely different mix from the commercial release and from the regular promo release. This copy has "Special Radio Re-Edit" printed at the top of the label.
1984
Duran Duran
Capitol 5345
The A side is a 4:25 "Dance Mix" of the song, edited from the 5:29 album version.
1984
Queen
Capitol 5350
The album version in this case is actually shorter than this 4:21 one at 3:21; this 45 version is an extended remix.
1985
Billy Joel
Columbia 04681
Reportedly, this 45 is a very different mix than the LP, with lots of added instruments.
1985
Freddie Jackson
Capitol 5495
The 45 is a different version than the LP cut.
1985
Sting
A&M 2787
This is a special version for the 45, different from the LP cut.
1985
Los Lobos
Slash/WB 29093
The label notes that this is a remix of the LP version.
1985
Talking Heads
Sire 28917
Both sides of this great single are remixes of the cut from the group's album "Little Creatures." The B side is dubbed the "E.T. Version," which is about a minute longer than the album cut.
1985
Tears For Fears
Mercury 880899
The label notes that this is a remixed version of the LP cut.
1985
Wham!
Columbia 04840
This promo has a 5:10 remixed version of the LP cut.
1986
Trouble Funk
Island 926
The label indicates this is a "Remix/Edit" version of the album cut.
1986
Journey
Columbia 06301
This single's A side is a "Hot Mix", remixed version of the album cut.
1987
Bruce Hornsby and the Range
RCA 14361
This is the second issue of the song, in a longer remix than the one on RCA 14361, which hit #72 in the summer of 1986.
1987
Bangles
Def Jam 07630
This is a Remixed version of the album cut... The back of the picture sleeve notes "Remixed and additional production by Bangles, Bill Drescher and David White."
1987
Madonna
Sire 28425
This special promo has the 4:01 album version on one side and a 3:58 "Remix" version on the other.
1987
Michael Jackson
Epic 07418
The label indicates this is a remix from the LP cut.
1987
New Order
Qwest 28271
The label indicates this is a remix from the LP cut, which reportedly has added synth segments.
1987
Paul Simon
WB 28460
The label indicates this is a remixed version of the LP cut.
1987
Robbie Robertson
Geffen 28175
This promo release has the 'Hot New Remix' version of the album cut.
1987
Salt-N-Pepa
Next Plateau 315
The label indicates this 45 is a "Remix" of the album cut.
1987
The Replacements
Sire 28151
The label indicates this is a special remix from the album cut by Jimmy Iovine.
1987
Whitesnake
Geffen 28339
Reportedly, this single version is a completely different recording than the LP version. For one thing, it gets going right away without the LP's synth intro.
1987
Janet Jackson
A&M 2906
This 4:30 track is a "Remix" version of the 4:37 album cut.
1987
Dan Seals
EMI 8377
This single has a remixed version of the album cut.
1988
Inxs
Atlantic 89080
This special promo has the LP version on one side and the "Radio Remix Edit" version on the other.
1988
Maxi Priest
Virgin 99269
The 45 release has a special 7" version remixed by John Gallen.
1988
Michael Jackson
Epic 07668
The label indicates this is a remixed version of the LP cut.
1988
Kon Kan
Atlantic 88969
This is a special mix for radio, different from the LP cut.
1988
Talking Heads
Sire 27992
The B side of "(Nothing But) Flowers" is a shorter, remixed version of the song, labeled the "Bush Mix," from the group's album "Naked."
1988
Was (Not Was)
Chrysalis 43331
This 3:38 45 version is a remixed, edited version of the 4:22 album cut.
1988
Chicago
Reprise 27766
This is a remixed version of the LP cut.
1988
Los Lobos
Slash/WB 28464
The 3:56 A side is a special edit/remix of the 4:48 album cut.
1988
Sade
Epic 07904
The label indicates this 3:35 track is a Remix (and edit) of the 4:01 album cut.
1988
Sir Mix-A-Lot
Nasty Mix 75555
This was the rapper's first chart single. It features the "Godzilla Remix Edit" of the 5:01 album track on one side and the "Video Edit" on the other.
1989
Def Leppard
Mercury 872614
This promo offers a 4:17 "Lunar Mix" version of the album cut.
1989
Fine Young Cannibals
I.R.S. 17845
This rare promo has a different catalog number than the hit version (MCA 53483), and the music is a complete remix, also longer than the commercial version at 4:53 versus 3:32.
1989
Ice-T
Sire 27574
Both of these recordings are remixed versions of the respective album tracks.
1989
Madonna
Sire 27539
This single has a special 5:19 7" mix (by Shep Pettibone), shorter than the 5:41 album track.
1990
Faith No More
Slash 19813
The A side is a "Radio Remix Edit" of the album version.
1990
Depeche Mode
Sire 19842
This is the "single version" of the 4:53 album track, presumably meaning it's a remix since it's actually a bit longer.
1991
Paul Simon
WB 19464
"Proof" is a special 45-only remix of the album cut.
1991
Right Said Fred
Charisma 98671
The A side is a special 7-inch mix of the LP cut, and the B side is a Spanish version.
1991
The Farm
Sire 19208
This 45 has a "Single Mix" of the album cut.
1992
Kris Kross
Columbia 74197
The A side is a "Radio Edit" of the 3:15 LP cut. The song isn't shorter than the LP cut, so the "Radio Edit" label must indicate a remix.
1993
95 South
Wrap 286
This single offers two different mixes of the album cut, one the "Radio Style" clocking at 4:26 and the other the "Ultimix," at 4:36.
1993
Belly
Sire 18570
The label indicates this is a remix from the LP cut.
1993
Confederate Railroad
Atlantic 87357
The A side is the "Dance Mix" version of the LP cut.
1993
Alan Jackson
Arista 12607
As the B side of "Mercury Blues," this version of "Chattahoochie" (which had topped the charts for 4 weeks earlier in 1993 on Arista 12560) is here labeled as the "Club Mix".
1994
Sheryl Crow
A&M 0836
This 4:12 track is a remixed version of the album cut.
1995
Los Del Rio
RCA 07863
This "Bayside Boys Mix" version of the LP cut clocks at 3:52. The LP version is 4:12.
1995
Total
Bad Boy 79050
The A side is labeled "Puff Daddy Remix Radio Edit" and actually clocks a few seconds longer than the 4:20 LP cut.
1996
Soul Asylum
Columbia 78215
The 45 release is a remix from the LP cut.
1998
Barenaked Ladies
Reprise 17174
The A side of this single is marked as a "Remix" of the album cut
2001
Enya
Reprise 16719
This is a remixed version of the LP cut.
2002
Elvis Presley
RCA 60575
This terrific single has the original (only 1:39!) version on one side and the "JXL Radio Edit Remix" (the 2002 hit version) on the other.
2004
Kelis
Star Trak 61139
The A side is a special 'Radio Edit' of the LP cut.
2004
Usher
Arista 61107
The A side is a 4:16 "Radio Mix" version of the LP cut.
2004
Mario
J 69540
Both sides of this big hit single are "Radio Versions" of the respective album tracks.
2005
Jennifer Lopez
Epic 72770
The A side is a "pop mix" and features rapping by Fabulous. The B side is a "radio edit" of the album cut and features rapping by Fat Joe.